humanrightswatch
humanrightswatch:



Tell the EPA to Protect Kids from Pesticides
“My head started hurting really bad, and I started seeing like all black.” It was mid-afternoon on a scorching summer day in eastern North Carolina when “Jimena,” a 14-year-old farmworker, walked into a tobacco field where she had been sent to work. No one told her that the field had been sprayed with pesticides just hours earlier. “I got really dizzy,” she said, “and I started throwing up.” She told me she was sick for two weeks.
Last summer, while I was investigating child labor on tobacco farms in the United States, I met dozens of children with similar stories. Of the 141 children my colleagues and I interviewed, half reported seeing tractors spraying pesticides in fields where they worked or in nearby fields. The kids said they could smell and feel the chemical spray as it drifted toward them. Many of them said they got sick afterward, with searing headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath, and skin rashes. What they didn’t know was that pesticide exposure can have serious long-term health effects, especially for kids.
US government action to protect child farmworkers is long overdue. But for the first time in 20 years, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to update the regulations designed to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure.
The proposed changes include many important protections—common sense measures such as requiring pesticide safety training for workers every year, rather than once every five years. And for the first time, the EPA has proposed setting a minimum age for two of the tasks that carry the highest risk of exposure to pesticides: applying them and “early entry work” in fields where pesticides have been sprayed and entry is restricted.
The problem? The EPA proposed setting the minimum age at just 16. If these regulations are adopted, children who are too young to legally buy alcohol or cigarettes will legally be able to spray highly toxic chemicals on US farms.
Read more.
Photo: A 16-year-old worker harvests tobacco on a farm in Kentucky. © 2013 Marcus Bleasdale/VII for Human Rights Watch

humanrightswatch:

Tell the EPA to Protect Kids from Pesticides

“My head started hurting really bad, and I started seeing like all black.” It was mid-afternoon on a scorching summer day in eastern North Carolina when “Jimena,” a 14-year-old farmworker, walked into a tobacco field where she had been sent to work. No one told her that the field had been sprayed with pesticides just hours earlier. “I got really dizzy,” she said, “and I started throwing up.” She told me she was sick for two weeks.

Last summer, while I was investigating child labor on tobacco farms in the United States, I met dozens of children with similar stories. Of the 141 children my colleagues and I interviewed, half reported seeing tractors spraying pesticides in fields where they worked or in nearby fields. The kids said they could smell and feel the chemical spray as it drifted toward them. Many of them said they got sick afterward, with searing headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath, and skin rashes. What they didn’t know was that pesticide exposure can have serious long-term health effects, especially for kids.

US government action to protect child farmworkers is long overdue. But for the first time in 20 years, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to update the regulations designed to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure.

The proposed changes include many important protections—common sense measures such as requiring pesticide safety training for workers every year, rather than once every five years. And for the first time, the EPA has proposed setting a minimum age for two of the tasks that carry the highest risk of exposure to pesticides: applying them and “early entry work” in fields where pesticides have been sprayed and entry is restricted.

The problem? The EPA proposed setting the minimum age at just 16. If these regulations are adopted, children who are too young to legally buy alcohol or cigarettes will legally be able to spray highly toxic chemicals on US farms.

Read more.

Photo: A 16-year-old worker harvests tobacco on a farm in Kentucky. © 2013 Marcus Bleasdale/VII for Human Rights Watch

sisterresister
sisterresister:

Sampat Pal Devi, 47I am the commander of the Gulabi Gang. I started the association in the 1990s, but I named it the Gulabi Gang two years ago. We aim to empower women, promote child education with an emphasis on girls, and stop corruption and domestic violence. I visit numerous villages every day and meet the various members of the gang. We have gang meetings where we decide the plan of action if we hear of something that we oppose going on. First we go to the police and request that they do something. But since the administration is against the poor people of our country, we often end up taking matters into our own hands. We first speak to the husband who is beating his wife. If he doesn’t understand then we ask his wife to join us while we beat him with lathis. Our missions have a 100 percent success rate. We have never failed in bringing justice when it comes to domestic problems. Dealing with the administration is the tricky part since we cannot always take the law in our hands—especially with such corrupt lawmakers. We did beat up some corrupt officials but we were ultimately helpless. The goons of the corrupt officials and the political parties constantly threaten me. Once, a few goons came and threatened to shoot me down, but the women came to my rescue and threw bricks at them and they ran away. They haven’t come back since. Although most of the time I travel alone, I am not scared of anyone. My women are with me, and they are my strength. My family didn’t always support me going out and doing what I do, but when I resisted and explained to my husband, he understood and has supported me since. It isn’t easy to do this. I have no money. I travel everywhere on an old bicycle. Some of our supporters help us with small donations and charity. I want this movement to carry on and would like support from international or local agencies.
www.vice.com/en_uk/read/flux-pink-indians-v15n2

sisterresister:

Sampat Pal Devi, 47

I am the commander of the Gulabi Gang. I started the association in the 1990s, but I named it the Gulabi Gang two years ago. We aim to empower women, promote child education with an emphasis on girls, and stop corruption and domestic violence. I visit numerous villages every day and meet the various members of the gang. We have gang meetings where we decide the plan of action if we hear of something that we oppose going on. First we go to the police and request that they do something. But since the administration is against the poor people of our country, we often end up taking matters into our own hands. We first speak to the husband who is beating his wife. If he doesn’t understand then we ask his wife to join us while we beat him with lathis. Our missions have a 100 percent success rate. We have never failed in bringing justice when it comes to domestic problems. Dealing with the administration is the tricky part since we cannot always take the law in our hands—especially with such corrupt lawmakers. We did beat up some corrupt officials but we were ultimately helpless. The goons of the corrupt officials and the political parties constantly threaten me. Once, a few goons came and threatened to shoot me down, but the women came to my rescue and threw bricks at them and they ran away. They haven’t come back since. Although most of the time I travel alone, I am not scared of anyone. My women are with me, and they are my strength. My family didn’t always support me going out and doing what I do, but when I resisted and explained to my husband, he understood and has supported me since. It isn’t easy to do this. I have no money. I travel everywhere on an old bicycle. Some of our supporters help us with small donations and charity. I want this movement to carry on and would like support from international or local agencies.

www.vice.com/en_uk/read/flux-pink-indians-v15n2

shock777

shock777:

adolf-clitlor:

drakeamez:

awesomenerdyfangirl:

anonymous-dudette:

I’m glad that Ferguson is getting attention, seriously I am, but I haven’t seen ONE post about what is happening over seas. Not even one post about the pictures above. Children are being beheaded and dragged into the streets where they are then shot because their families are Christian. Women are being raped and murdered. Men are being murdered. PEOPLE are dying. It’s a Christian Holocaust. And I haven’t seen anything on Tumblr.

Why aren’t any of you furious about this?! Where’s the “social justice?” ISIS is murdering people who don’t convert to Islam (yes, I know they’re extremists and not all Muslims are like that. Save yourself the rant) but I really want to know why this hasn’t been given the attention it deserves.

Seriously, guys. This is really scary, and we need to raise attention for these people. They so desperately need our prayers and support.

This happening to christian KURDS and yezidis

There has also been over 100 girls under the age of 15 that have been raped by ISIS soldiers and have been forced into committing suicide. The Kurdish Christians and Yezedis that are on the run are begging for a quick death. The ISIS leader has threatened to ‘drown our enemies in their own blood’ which includes non-muslim Kurds, Americans and other countries that have offered to help stop this genocide. What the Kurds are going through is completely tragic, and they’ve already been through so much. So many Kurdish peshmerga have been slaughtered, this is going to turn out to be a total massacre….

The Lord is with us. This is absolutely heart breaking. I know God has a plan. I know he will come through for us. Jesus protect your children. You love them so much.

linneart

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

bloodwort:

frusturbation:

janefondle:

xpsycho:

eatimitationcrab:

setbabiesonfire:

Sgt. Thomas McVicar of the Jersey City Police Department shot 22 year old Kwadir Felton, leaving him blind, after Kwadir pulled a gun on him, he claims. Kwadir Felton denied the accusation, stating that he doesn’t even carry guns.

"I don’t understand!" Felton yelled at a police officer before his mother was removed from the courtroom. "You didn’t have to shoot me in the head for no reason! You trying to charge me with something I didn’t do!"

Sign the Change.org petition and get this story out there.

SIGN THE PETITION. Still at least 1,000 signatures needed. SIGNAL BOOST THIS or i will judge you.

This post has 140k notes, yet the change.org petition only has 44k. Sign the damn petition! 

This broke my fucking heart.

hey this needs about 16k more signatures

SIGNAL BOOST

linneart

isis-:

seekingtheunordinary:

deathbeforediet:

canwriteitbetterthanueverfeltit:

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Joan Rivers on the Ed Sullivan Show, 1967 (x)

HOW IN THE WORLD DID SHE TALK LIKE THIS BACK THEN AND END UP HOSTING A SHOW TEARING APART WHAT PEOPLE LOOK FOR A FRIGGING LIVING????

SHOCKED when I got to the bottom and saw “Joan Rivers”.

You either die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.

That is the best use for that quote i have ever seen…